How Lobos Feel About The School Shutdown

This is a Wordle created using the most common words students and teachers used to describe the shutdown Wednesday. NOTE: Some parts of the following quotes may be upsetting.

This is a Wordle created using the most common words students and teachers used to describe the shutdown Wednesday. NOTE: Some parts of the following quotes may be upsetting.

Payton Perkins, Staff Writer

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Torie Wolfe, senior, “I was pissed off that we had to shut down our school because we had no idea where this girl was, and that one person could do this to a whole state. And it’s scary to think there are crazy people that are our own age that want to hurt other students, which I was really upset about. I was really excited when they caught her, the sense of security came back to me. But then, I got worried that other kids just because they didn’t want school would maybe try to pull a similar thing and maybe not execute it.”

Nature Manna, sophomore, pictured with his friend Isaac McKinley, junior. “I thought that it was messed up that we had to have a day like this, but it also wasn’t here, it was Denver mostly. I still didn’t wanna go to school that day because she was hiding near us. My emotions about the situation were negative emotions but it was still a good day for me.”

Georgia Koepspell, junior, “Honestly, I feel like I was kinda numb to it. I’m so used to these threats that it’s kinda like, ‘That sucks, but I’m not all that surprised.’ I was freaked out, but I knew that everyone in immediate danger had cancelled school. Everybody was just kinda shocked, especially parents because they grew up in a time where you could just walk onto an airplane. I’ve grown up in a time with this being more or less the norm, and intense security being necessary. I think parents were more affected.”

Greymond Nina, senior (right), “I was just a little confused. I didn’t really think much of it because she was more into Denver probably than into Fort Collins. Tough situation, honestly.”
Tristan Traufield, junior (left), “I was just kinda surprised about what was going down, and it was interesting how it was a huge deal. Florida, Texas, where I’m from it’s like that everywhere you go. All you hear is shots, all that, so it was interesting for sure. I was surprised for sure.”

Amy White, RMHS English teacher, “I had only been vaguely aware of that whole thing, because I knew they were on a lockout in Denver so then I just read some more details. Then I was just sad. I was just sad that that’s where we’re at, and I went back and forth all day between being sad and being kinda angry, that one person can shut down all the schools. We just keep seeing this, and I’m not sure what we’re gonna do.”

Sara Lea, RMHS geography teacher, “I have a personal connection with Columbine, so I was more shook-up with our unknown Code 99 the week prior to the day off because as teachers we didn’t hear anything for 6 minutes. It sickened me that I was trying to use my ear to hear gunshots and screaming, that was unsettling. The for Wednesday, in light of the 20th anniversary of Columbine, it was very raw. All of it was coming up for me as a teacher. I also have students that go to Rocky that have been in school shootings in the past, not only dealing with my own issues but also my students experiencing their PTSD, so it was pretty raw.”

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